Tag Archives: boomiebol poems

What Words Can I Say?

Standard

What words can I say?
To the one who writes the script
To the tale and every season of my life

A life that seems
Less than perfect
Mistakes and disappointments
From and on every side

Yet he remains the author
The one who perfects my faith
My source and renewal on days of doubt

Savior and heartwarming king
His love is inscribed on this beating heart
Hope pumping back in time

What words can I then say
But thank you
To the one who loves me
Through winter’s chill
And summer’s heat

His good grace bringing hope in spring

Orişa òyìnbó- Friday Fictioneers 9/21

Standard

Friday fictioneers courtesy of Madison Woods is up and running, and this week’s photo is by Lora Mitchell. I have a poem that went over the 100 word limit this week, many thanks to the image that had me thinking ancient/traditional myths, African gods and such. Comments, and constructive criticisms are welcome. Feel free to participate in this writing challenge. Thank you always!

Image courtesy of Lora Mitchell

Orişa òyìnbó
Humbly we come
Heads bowed in utmost supplication

Visit our lowly lands
We pray thee
Make them as pure as yours is perceived
For often we are told your streets are gold
Money growing green on your giant oak trees

Orişa òyìnbó
Spread your three winged might over our infants
Fast removing their sad plights and inherited misfortunes
May they grow to be innovators and leaders
Like the white man’s sons
Death far away from them

Orişa òyìnbó
Heal our hearts
Make them white and pure
Polished like the color of your sculpted image

Meet our needs
We ask thee
Peace superseding all greed and ills
Let our lands know growth like your people’s
Grace us with your goodness and elegance
May our lands be bountiful
As we come humbly
Thoughts bowed in adulation
Offering sacrifices befitting our ancestral gods
Ogún and Ṣàngó

Revive our lands
Orişa òyìnbó
Show superiority over the shortcomings of our gods
Make us whole
We beseech thee

Orişa òyìnbó
Iwin nlá
Make us whole
Heal these lands and revive our hearts

AUTHOR’S NOTES: As with many cultures, there are ancient gods, traditions, and myths. I saw this image and the idea for this poem came to mind. Before many Africans became christians; they worshipped diverse gods…I wrote this with the mindset of a person who visited Greece or some other western world, and assumed this creature to be a god, and considering the white man’s “assumed” influence, he imagined perhaps that their gods might carry the same influence over his own gods. Many of the unfamiliar terms here are in Yorùbá, one of the three major languages in Nigeria. Here are the meanings of the words:

Orişa òyìnbó- white man’s god
Ogún- god of iron
Ṣàngó- god of thunder and fire
Iwin nlá- (big) strange “out of this world” creature